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Jesus: Taking the nature of a servant
Philippians 2:6 - Philippians 2:11, Matthew 5:43 - Matthew 5:48

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Sermon Notes

Why did Jesus come as a servant?

Bible Passage

Philippians 2:6–11 (Listen)

who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped,1 but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant,2 being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, 10 so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, 11 and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

Footnotes

[1] 2:6 Or a thing to be held on to for advantage
[2] 2:7 Or slave (for the contextual rendering of the Greek word doulos, see Preface)

(ESV)

Matthew 5:43–48 (Listen)

Love Your Enemies

43 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ 44 But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. 46 For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? 47 And if you greet only your brothers,1 what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? 48 You therefore must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.

Footnotes

[1] 5:47 Or brothers and sisters. In New Testament usage, depending on the context, the plural Greek word adelphoi (translated “brothers”) may refer either to brothers or to brothers and sisters

(ESV)